Forget the 'New Normal' and embrace the question WHY

07 July 2020 5 min read
Written by

Adam Tuckwell

Mobas' Commercial Director Adam Tuckwell encourages you to cast aside the language of Coronavirus and make 2020 the year we unite in asking one question. 'Why?'

It's often around this time of year that those cunning linguists at Oxford University Press and Cambridge University Press start to scratch their heads in search of the word of the year.

When finding a word or phrase for 2020, there's going to be some (un)healthy competition. Where do we start? New-Normal, Social Distancing, Covid-19. The list of contenders is likely to be a long one.

But from my lockdown experience, there's no competition. The word of 2020 isn't actually a word. It's a question. 'Why?'

My 'free' time is typically spent answering 'why?' to every action witnessed by my three children who utter the phrase hundreds of times a day.  They are inquisitive, persistent and keen to challenge and discover - quite simply - why things are as they are.

As we grow up, we seem to become more accepting of the world we live in. But 2020 has shown us that we no longer need to be afraid of tacking the big questions.

In 2020, why do some people think black lives don't matter? Why should society be unequal between the rich and the poor? Why don't we prioritise green issues? Why is their still inequality of gender? This year seems full of examples where people have joined in a collective voice to ask these big questions and demand answers. 

We should apply this same philosophy to our work. At Mobas, we always seek to start any conversation with both new and existing clients with the question. It's our opportunity as consultants to challenge the accepted norm. To pose the questions others aren't able or willing to ask. By being inquisitive ourselves, we are able to guide and support leaders in unlocking the potential within their business. 

We ask the question not to challenge but to get you thinking. Asking 'why' sparks creativity. It's gives everyone a chance to express their views and opinions. It opens us up to reflect on how we make decisions, act and behave. Over a decade ago, Simon Sinek started a movement to help people become more inspired at work, and in turn, inspire their colleagues and customers by simply encouraging them to ask the question. 

It's hugely unlikely that 'Why' will win out as the word of the year when the academics make their final call. But I encourage you all to take up the mantle, unlock your inner toddler and, every now and then, just ask the question, 'Why?'. Go on. Try it. Why not?